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Elizabeth Warren calls on agency chiefs to commit to not deploying federal forces on Americans should Trump not leave office

“You are each responsible for the command of military or civilian troops and domestic law,” the Massachusetts Democrat wrote in a letter Tuesday to Defense Secretary Mark Esper, Attorney General Bill Barr, Interior Secretary David Bernhardt and acting Homeland Security Secretary Chad Wolf.

Warren pointed to Trump’s threats to send federal authorities to more US cities — after deploying forces in Portland, Seattle and Chicago, “despite clear opposition from governors, mayors, and citizens who are exercising their First Amendment rights in the communities in which these federal personnel have been deployed.”

And she raised concerns over whether Trump will use federal forces against civilians should he lose reelection and deny a peaceful transition of power — a scenario Democrats have raised and Trump has stoked by refusing to say he will accept the election results.

She requested the secretaries’ commitments, as well as information on any federal requests to activate their agencies’ forces by August 3.

“I urge you not to allow these personnel under your command or supervision to be used in any future domestic actions against people exercising their right to protest,” Warren wrote.

Warren also expressed concern over “the potential for President Trump to activate domestic forces as his ‘personal militia’ (as former Secretary of Homeland Security Tom Ridge put it),” “given his ongoing refusal” to say he will accept the presidential election results and peacefully leave office.

“I therefore write to seek your assurances that you will not allow the military or civilian forces under your control to be used by the President to suppress dissent and democracy,” she added.

In an interview earlier this month, Trump repeatedly refused to affirm that he would accept the results of the election in November, claiming falsely that mail-in ballots could rig the outcome.”I have to see. No, I’m not going to just say yes,” Trump said when pressed on “Fox News Sunday” about whether he would accept the results. “I’m not going to say no, and I didn’t last time either.”

Prior to Warren’s letter, Barr addressed such issues during his testimony Tuesday before the House Judiciary Committee, where he said that federal officers had been sent to protect federal buildings “under attack” and combat violence crime in cities. Barr said that he has made clear to the Trump administration that he “would like to pick the cities” where federal law enforcement officers are deployed under a Justice Department crime-fighting program “based on law enforcement need.”

Asked what he would do if Trump lost the election but refused to leave office, Barr caveated his answer: “If the results are clear, I would leave office.”

CNN’s David Shortell and Jeremy Herb contributed to this report.

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Elizabeth Warren asks CDC to mandate masks, citing Georgia’s local ban

That power, Warren writes in the letter obtained by CNN, could come from a code of federal regulations for public health already in place that allows the CDC to limit interstate travel to control communicable diseases.

Warren also asked whether the CDC would step in “in instances where state governors or other officials order the removal of restrictions or mask mandates.”

“I would like to know whether the CDC will use its authorities to intervene allowing orders of this kind, like Georgia Governor Brian Kemp’s announcement last week, would seem to be in direct contradiction to the Department’s mandate,” Warren wrote.

The CDC has advised that “cloth face coverings are meant to protect other people in case the wearer is unknowingly infected but does not have symptoms.” The agency also said everyone “should wear a cloth face cover when they have to go out in public, for example to the grocery store or to pick up other necessities.”
And the benefits go both ways. “Your cloth face covering may protect them. Their cloth face covering may protect you,” the CDC said.

Warren requested “more information on whether and how the CDC plans to use its authorities” under federal code that could allow the public agency “to institute mask mandates, implement restrictions on gatherings, reverse reopenings, and enforce other public health measures.”

Warren and other Senate Democrats have used letters and hearings to keep pressure on the CDC during the coronavirus pandemic. Warren’s eldest brother died of coronavirus in April.

CNN’s Hollt Yan contributed to this report.

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Joe Biden’s VP slot not Elizabeth Warren’s do-over for WH campaign

“Nevertheless, she persisted.”

That short phrase became Sen. Elizabeth Warren’s badge of honor after Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell made the remark in defense of silencing Warren’s objections to the confirmation of Sen. Jeff Sessions as U.S. Attorney General in 2017.

Warren was interrupted as she read from a letter written by Coretta Scott King about Sessions.

McConnell noted on the Senate floor: “Senator Warren was giving a lengthy speech. She had appeared to violate the rule. She was warned. She was given an explanation. Nevertheless, she persisted.”

And a feminist hashtag was born.

Back then, the phrase embodied Warren as a barrier-breaking, fight-for-the-little-guy leader.

Today, it’s a bleat about a pol who won’t get off the stage.

In the horse race that marked the final months of the Democratic presidential primary race, Warren was a contender, swapping first, second and third position with Vice President Joe Biden and Vermont Sen. Bernie Sanders. Until she couldn’t make it past the head of the stretch and called it quits.

One of the reasons given for her slide in the polls (and poor performance at the voting booth) was her perceived “electability” — how likely she was to beat Trump in November.

A few months ago, that was top of mind.

But a moral earthquake shook America between then and now, and we’re still feeling the aftershocks, as protests continue over racial injustice, police reform and equality for people of color.

Biden said he would pick a woman running mate, back when “electability” was the overriding issue.

A good pol knows how to read the room, and if Biden has learned anything from his decades on the beat it’s that Democratic voters are signaling that they want something more.

In April, more than 200 Black women leaders and activists in the Democratic party signed an open letter to Biden calling on him to select a Black woman as his running mate.

“It is a fact that the road to the White House is powered by Black women and Black women are the key to a Democratic victory in 2020,” they wrote.

“I’m even more convinced than ever that when we see what is happening right now in this country, there is a cry, there’s a clarion call, for us to do something different, for this country to literally face structural racism … We feel like a Black woman could actually bring that to the ticket,” LaTosha Brown, the co-founder of Black Voters Matter Fund and a political strategist told NPR Radio.

The country is having a moment — and that moment is not about Elizabeth Warren.

Yes, she ticks off all the progressive boxes that delight Democrats today — free college, the Green New Deal — but this is not the time for a white woman who padded her resume with false claims of Native American ancestry to have another go at winning the hearts and mind of voters of color.

Not that there was ever a good time to do that.

Polling whiz Nate Silver told ABC News that Trump’s troubles could lead to a “landslide” for Biden.

“Joe Biden leads by around 9 points in our national polling average, and that lead has been growing,” he said.

“So, Trump needs to make a comeback, and there is plenty of time for that, and maybe also get some help from the Electoral College,” Silver added.

Trump is being pummeled in the polls,  but as 2016 showed us, it ain’t over ’til it’s over.

And for Biden, the difference between the winner’s circle and a concession speech could well hinge on his pick for VP.

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Elizabeth Warren’s outreach to black voters could help VP standing

WASHINGTON (AP) — Shortly before Elizabeth Warren joined their virtual happy hour on a recent Friday afternoon, the five African American women co-hosting the #TheSipHour mused about calling her by her first name.

The Massachusetts senator had her own moniker in mind.

“I was going to say I’m here today as an ally, but can we really just say co-conspirator?” laughed Warren, one of the few white women to appear at the events organized by Higher Heights For America, which promotes the organizing and voting power of black women. “Nothing’s going to change unless it is black women’s voices that are uplifted.”

Such overtures could help Warren’s bid to become Joe Biden’s running mate. The presumptive Democratic nominee is under mounting pressure to pick a black woman in the wake of recent outrage over racial injustice and police brutality. But some black leaders say Warren’s progressive politics, economic populism and specific policy proposals addressing everything from maternal mortality to the coronavirus could put her in a strong position.

“I think she’s totally still viable,” said Nelini Stamp, director of strategy and partnerships for the Working Families Party, a progressive labor activist group that endorsed Warren in the primary. “Warren is one of the folks whose been talking about big structural change. And when we’re thinking about re-imagining public safety, that is something that’s going to require some actual structural change.”

Representatives for Warren and Biden declined to comment. The pair speak frequently, and Warren hosted a virtual fundraiser for Biden on Monday that raised an impressive $6 million.

Warren told an audience of more than 600 that when her eldest brother died of the coronavirus in April “he was alone. I couldn’t be with him.” But she said Biden called and “told funny stories that made me laugh in a way that reminds us all of the good times that we have had with someone we have loved and lost.”

“He offered me kindness and comfort at a time when I needed some kindness and comfort,” Warren said, “because that’s the kind of man Joe Biden is.”

“The door to change has been cracked open,” Warren said. “If we want to swing that door wide open then we must do the most good that we can do at this moment.” She urged sowing “a seed for the America of your greatest imaginations.”

Biden’s vice presidential search is entering a new round of vetting, and Warren is still on the list along with several black women. They include Sen. Kamala Harris of California; Susan Rice, who served as President Barack Obama’s national security adviser; Atlanta Mayor Keisha Lance Bottoms; and Rep. Val Demings. New Mexico Gov. Michelle Lujan Grisham, a Latina, is also being considered.

Some Democrats say Amy Klobuchar’s standing has fallen since George Floyd’s killing by Minneapolis police. The Minnesota senator, who’s white, was a prosecutor years ago in the county that includes Minneapolis. During that period, more than two dozen people — mostly people of color — died during encounters with police.

The search was described by Democrats familiar with the process. They spoke on condition of anonymity because they weren’t authorized to publicly discuss the vetting.

During her bid for the Democratic nomination, Warren actively courted black activists and assembled a deep roster of endorsements. She gave a memorable speech in Atlanta in November on empowering black women and combating institutional racism that some African American leaders laud as prescient.

Warren talked ”in a very straightforward manner about many of the systemic issues that have plagued African Americans from the very beginning of our time here in America,” said South Carolina state Rep. Kambrell Garvin, who endorsed Warren in the primary. He said those included voter suppression and redlining, a term for banking standards that long made it difficult, if not impossible, for black families to secure mortgages in white neighborhoods.

“I think that she could be an interesting and compelling pick for Vice President Biden in regards to reaching out to African American voters,” Garvin said.

Still, Warren’s appeals didn’t translate to primary votes.

Some 61% of African American voters supported Biden, according to AP VoteCast surveys in 17 states that voted between Feb. 3 and March 17. Warren earned just 5% of their vote, far less than the race’s other strong progressive voice, Vermont Sen. Bernie Sanders, at 21%.

But about 7 in 10 black voters nonetheless said they would be satisfied if Warren won the Democratic nomination for president, roughly as many that said that of Sanders. That suggests favorable ratings possibly durable enough to apply to the vice presidency under Biden.

Warren has continued to focus on race after ending her presidential campaign.

She joined Black Lives Matter protesters outside the White House this month with her husband and their golden retriever, Bailey. She has called for banning chokeholds as just the start of a larger overhaul of policing nationwide, and introduced legislation prohibiting the use of Confederate names and symbols from all U.S. military assets that has even drawn the support of some of her Republican Senate colleagues — as well as Biden.

The Rev. Jesse Jackson hosted a virtual town hall with Warren this month on the effects of the coronavirus. He said he still considers her “in the mix” for the vice presidential slot, but said picking a black woman could give Biden a boost in support from African American female voters that might be similar to the one that lifted Democrat Doug Jones to an upset 2017 Senate victory in Alabama.

“I think he should choose an African American,” Jackson said. “He needs the South to come alive.”

During her appearance on #TheSipHour, Warren was asked candidly by Fatima Goss Graves, president and CEO of the National Women’s Law Center, how she talked with white relatives and friends about the protest movement. Warren responded that she’s stressed the need for non-blacks to educate themselves on the African American perspective.

“You’ve got to stop talking,” she said, “and start listening.”

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Elizabeth Warren and Cory Booker Join Forces on Bill to Ban Most Factory Farming by 2040

Sen. Elizabeth Warren announced Thursday that she would be co-sponsoring Sen. Cory Booker’s bill to phase out large-scale factory farming by 2040.

The Farm System Reform Act would prohibit new large factory farms from going into business and force others to cease expansions before halting operations entirely within two decades. Warren’s support for the law comes after multiple reports of unsafe conditions in the meatpacking industry amid the COVID-19 pandemic. Rep. Ro Khanna is also co-sponsoring the effort and has introduced companion legislation to the House.

“For years, regulators looked the other way while giant multinational corporations crushed competition in the agriculture sector and seized control over key markets,” Warren said in a statement. “The COVID-19 crisis will make it easier for Big Ag to get even bigger, gobble up smaller farms, and lead to fewer choices for consumers.”

“We need to attack this consolidation head-on and give workers, farmers, and consumers bargaining power in our farm and food system,” added Warren. “I’m glad to partner with Senator Booker and Representative Khanna to start reversing the hyper-concentration in our farm economy.”


Sen. Cory Booker (D-N.J.) and Sen. Elizabeth Warren (D-Mass.) share the stage during a Democratic presidential debate in Miami, Florida on June 26, 2019.
Joe Raedle/Getty

As many in the country began to fear shortages of meat, President Donald Trump issued an executive order late last month that invoked the Defense Production Act in an attempt to compel meatpackers to remain open as “critical infrastructure,” despite large outbreaks of COVID-19 that have reportedly overwhelmed some facilities.

While Booker’s legislation may seem timely due to the impact the pandemic is having on the meat industry, it was originally proposed by the senator in December 2019. The bill was intended to support smaller farms by countering the influence of large, monopolistic corporations that had “run roughshod over the marketplace,” according to Booker.

If passed, the law would place an immediate moratorium on new large factory farms—also known as “CAFOs,” or concentrated animal feeding operations. The largest CAFOs would be entirely phased out by 2040. Medium and small-sized operations would not be prohibited, although voluntary buyouts would be offered for farmers who want to cease factory farming.

Corporations would also be held responsible for environmental damage caused by CAFOs. In addition, law would enforce mandatory country-of-origin labelling for beef, pork and dairy products, while prohibiting the Department of Agriculture from labelling any imported meat as a “Product of USA.”

“Our food system was not broken by the pandemic and it was not broken by independent family farmers,” said Booker. “It was broken by large, multinational corporations like Tyson, Smithfield, and JBS that, because of their buying power and size, have undue influence over the marketplace and over public policy.”

“That undue influence was on full display with President Trump’s recent executive order prioritizing meatpacker profits over the health and safety of workers,” Booker added.

Newsweek reached out to Booker’s office, who declined to comment further.

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Anti-Kavanaugh Crusader Elizabeth Warren ‘Satisfied’ With Joe Biden’s Response To Reade Allegations

During the Brett Kavanaugh hearings, Elizabeth Warren was one of the loudest critics.

Now that Joe Biden has been accused of sexual assault, she is just fine taking Biden’s word for it that nothing happened.

It just goes to show that the MeToo movement was never really about protecting women. It was all about politics and power for the left.

The Washington Examiner reports:

TRENDING: MUST WATCH: Tearful Nurse Blows Whistle on New York Hospitals ‘Murdering’ COVID Patients With ‘Complete Medical Mismanagement’

Senate Democrats stand by Biden: ‘Credible and convincing’ defense against sex assault claim

Sen. Elizabeth Warren and other Democrats said Monday they back Joe Biden as the Democratic nominee for president in spite of allegations by former aide Tara Reade that he sexually assaulted her in 1993 when he was a senator.

Warren and other Democrats said they listened to Biden’s denial during an MSNBC interview last week and are satisfied with the former vice president’s response to Reade’s claim.

“The vice president’s answers were credible and convincing,” Warren, a Massachusetts Democrat and former candidate for president, told reporters as she headed into the chamber to vote. “I support the vice president. I support his campaign, and I am proud to endorse him for president.”

Biden told MSNBC’s Morning Joe Reade’s claim is not true. “I’m saying unequivocally, it never, never happened,” he said during the interview on Friday.

Democrats suggested the matter has been fully vetted by the media and has been proven untrue.

The double standard is amazing, isn’t it?

Flashback…

Does she think no one remembers?

Cross posted from American Lookout.

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Sen. Elizabeth Warren says her oldest brother died of coronavirus

Former presidential candidate Elizabeth Warren

Elizabeth Warren, a US senator from Massachusetts, speaks during a campaign event in March 2019.

Former presidential candidate Elizabeth Warren

Former presidential candidate Elizabeth Warren

Former presidential candidate Elizabeth Warren

Former presidential candidate Elizabeth Warren

In the late 1960s, Warren attended George Washington University on a debate scholarship. She dropped out after two years to get married, but she graduated from the University of Houston in 1970.

Former presidential candidate Elizabeth Warren

Warren holds her newborn daughter, Amelia, in 1971. She and her first husband, Jim Warren, had two children before divorcing in 1980.

Former presidential candidate Elizabeth Warren

Warren with her three brothers — Don, John and David — in 1980. After graduating from college, Warren worked as a speech pathologist at a New Jersey elementary school. She then got a law degree and taught at the Rutgers School of Law before becoming a professor at the University of Houston Law Center. She’s also been a professor at the University of Texas Law School, the University of Pennsylvania Law School and Harvard Law School.

Former presidential candidate Elizabeth Warren

Former presidential candidate Elizabeth Warren

Warren teaches at the University of Pennsylvania Law School in the early 1990s.

Former presidential candidate Elizabeth Warren

US Sen. Barack Obama listens to Warren speak during a roundtable discussion about predatory lending in 2008. Warren is an expert on bankruptcy law and was an adviser to the National Bankruptcy Review Commission in the 1990s. In 1989, Warren co-authored the book “As We Forgive Our Debtors: Bankruptcy and Consumer Credit in America.”

Former presidential candidate Elizabeth Warren

Warren takes her seat to testify before the House Budget Committee in 2009. The United States was battling a recession at the time, and Warren had been appointed to a congressional oversight panel overseeing the $700 billion Troubled Assets Relief Program.

Former presidential candidate Elizabeth Warren

Warren and Treasury Secretary Timothy Geithner listen to President Barack Obama at the White House in September 2010. Obama was appointing Warren to be his assistant and special adviser to the Treasury Secretary in order to launch the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau. Warren had long called for a federal agency designed to protect consumers from fraudulent or misleading financial products.

Former presidential candidate Elizabeth Warren

Warren and US Sen. Scott Brown, right, make fun of each other during an annual St. Patrick’s Day breakfast in Boston. Warren announced in 2011 that she would be challenging Brown for his Senate seat..

Former presidential candidate Elizabeth Warren

Warren speaks to constituents at a campaign event in Scituate, Massachusetts, in May 2012.

Former presidential candidate Elizabeth Warren

Warren takes a morning walk with her dog Otis on the Harvard University Business School campus in May 2012.

Former presidential candidate Elizabeth Warren

Warren stands with family members after giving a speech in Springfield, Massachusetts, in June 2012. Warren has several grandchildren.

Former presidential candidate Elizabeth Warren

President Barack Obama greets Warren at a fundraiser in Boston in June 2012.

Former presidential candidate Elizabeth Warren

Warren speaks at the Democratic National Convention in September 2012.

Former presidential candidate Elizabeth Warren

Warren greets supporters during a campaign event at Boston University.

Former presidential candidate Elizabeth Warren

Warren takes the stage after defeating Brown for a Senate seat in November 2012.

Former presidential candidate Elizabeth Warren

Warren listens during a hearing of the Senate Committee on Banking, Housing and Urban Affairs in May 2013.

Former presidential candidate Elizabeth Warren

Warren meets with Supreme Court nominee Merrick Garland in April 2016.

Former presidential candidate Elizabeth Warren

Warren campaigns with Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton in June 2016.

Former presidential candidate Elizabeth Warren

Former presidential candidate Elizabeth Warren

In January 2017, Warren posted this photo of her and Obama together. Obama was leaving after two terms as President.

Former presidential candidate Elizabeth Warren

Former presidential candidate Elizabeth Warren

Warren and other Democrats listen as President Donald Trump speaks to a joint session of Congress in February 2017.

Former presidential candidate Elizabeth Warren

US Sen. Bob Corker talks with Warren during a Senate committee hearing in June 2017.

Former presidential candidate Elizabeth Warren

Former presidential candidate Elizabeth Warren

Warren runs down Boston’s Clarendon Street waving to crowds during the annual Boston Pride Parade in June 2018.

Former presidential candidate Elizabeth Warren

Warren and US Sen. Susan Collins ride the Senate subway in June 2018.

Former presidential candidate Elizabeth Warren

Warren is seen in the sunglasses of Arian Rustemi during a rally in Boston in June 2018. Warren was calling for the swift reunification of children and parents who had been separated at the US-Mexico border.

Former presidential candidate Elizabeth Warren

Warren helps Georgia gubernatorial candidate Stacey Abrams make calls to voters in October 2018.

Former presidential candidate Elizabeth Warren

A Warren figurine sits in the back pocket of Mary Jo Kane during a town-hall event in Boston in October 2018.

Former presidential candidate Elizabeth Warren

Warren was re-elected in 2018. Here, she is joined by her husband, Bruce Mann, as Vice President Mike Pence re-enacts her swearing-in.

Former presidential candidate Elizabeth Warren

Warren, her husband and dog Bailey attend an event in Manchester, New Hampshire, in January 2019. Warren had recently announced that she was forming an exploratory committee for the 2020 presidential race.

Former presidential candidate Elizabeth Warren

Warren speaks in Columbia, South Carolina, in January 2019.

Former presidential candidate Elizabeth Warren

Warren looks down at the crowd in Lawrence, Massachusetts, before formally announcing her presidential bid in February 2019.

Former presidential candidate Elizabeth Warren

Warren answers questions at a town-hall event in Jackson, Mississippi, in March 2019.

Former presidential candidate Elizabeth Warren

Warren makes a pinky promise with 8-year-old Sydney Hansen during a campaign stop in Peterborough, New Hampshire, in July 2019.

Former presidential candidate Elizabeth Warren

Former presidential candidate Elizabeth Warren

Warren makes her signature “pinky promise” during a campaign event in Lebanon, New Hampshire, in February 2020.

Former presidential candidate Elizabeth Warren

Warren speaks at her Super Tuesday rally in Detroit in March 2020.

Former presidential candidate Elizabeth Warren

Warren acknowledges supporters as she arrives to speak to the media outside her home in Cambridge, Massachusetts, in March 2020. She had just dropped out of the presidential race.

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Sen. Elizabeth Warren’s brother dies of coronavirus

Don Reed Herring, a veteran and the oldest brother of U.S. Sen. Elizabeth Warren, died of coronavirus, the senator announced Thursday.

Herring died Tuesday evening, Warren said in a statement. He was 86.

“He was charming and funny, a natural leader,” Warren tweeted. “What made him extra special was his smile — quick and crooked, it always seemed to generate its own light, one that lit up everyone around him.”

Herring joined the Air Force at age 19 and spent his career serving in the military, including “five and a half years off and on in combat in Vietnam,” Warren said.

Warren thanked the medical staff who cared for her brother as he battled COVID-19 — and detailed the sadness of the family being kept apart at the end by the restrictions wrought by the highly contagious disease.

“I’m grateful to the nurses and frontline staff who took care of him, but it’s hard to know that there was no family to hold his hand or to say ‘I love you’ one more time — and no funeral for those of us who loved him to hold each other close,” Warren said. “I’ll miss you dearly my brother.”

Herring is survived by Warren and their two siblings, John and David Herring. All three brothers served in the military, and all three lived in Oklahoma.

The Massachusetts senator spoke often and fondly of her brothers on the presidential campaign trail, though they were largely unseen — appearing with her in a family video and when she stumped through Oklahoma. She often drew on the siblings’ political differences to argue how she could bridge the divide between Democrats and Republicans.

“Two of my three brothers are Republicans. And sure, there are a lot of things we disagree on,” Warren said during a January debate. “But the truth is, there’s a whole lot we agree on.”

Herring’s passing drew an outpouring of support for Warren from her former 2020 Democratic rivals and her fellow Bay Staters.

 

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Elizabeth Warren’s brother dies of coronavirus

Elizabeth Warren’s oldest brother has died of COVID-19, the senator announced.

Don Reed Herring died Tuesday evening at age 86, Warren said on Thursday.

“He was charming and funny, a natural leader,” Warren tweeted. “What made him extra special was his smile — quick and crooked, it always seemed to generate its own light, one that lit up everyone around him.”

Herring joined the Air Force at age 19 and spent his career serving in the military, including “5½ years off and on in combat in Vietnam,” Warren said.

The senator, 70, is the youngest of four siblings.

Warren thanked the medical staff who cared for her brother at a time when the family was not able to visit him.

“I’m grateful to the nurses and frontline staff who took care of him, but it’s hard to know that there was no family to hold his hand or to say ‘I love you’ one more time — and no funeral for those of us who loved him to hold each other close,” Warren said. “I’ll miss you dearly my brother.”